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Los excepcionales del mes de octubre de 2017

Disc review published on October 04, 2017 in Sherzo in Spanish

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

The result of this recording is simply magnificent. Tim Fain and Michael Borinskin are soloists of great class, and Angel Gil-Ordóñez does an extraordinary job at the helm of his PostClassical Ensemble of Washington.

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Harrison: Concierto para violín / Grand Duo / Double Music

Disc review published on October 01, 2017 in Ritmo.es in Spanish

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

The performances are irreproachable, which make this recording the best introduction ever registered to the work of Harrison.

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Lou Harrison zum 100. Geburtstag

Disc review published on May 19, 2017 in Pizzicato in German

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

Three intriguingly special works, extremely well served by the performers. The recording is altogether first class and one superb homage to Lou Harrison for his 100th birthday.

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Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto review – brilliant, utterly contemporary writing

Disc review published on May 04, 2017 in The Guardian

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

Lou Harrison had a pioneer’s imagination, not least regarding what might be walloped in the name of music – his Violin Concerto calls for flowerpots, plumber’s pipes and clock coils in the percussion. What’s more striking in this performance by Tim Fain, the PostClassical Ensemble and conductor Angel Gil-Ordóñez is the brilliance of his writing for violin, a collision between itchy dance rhythms and soaring lyricism.

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(++++) Concertos and more

Disc review published on May 04, 2017 in Infodad.com

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

Tim Fain plays the work skillfully, and Angel Gil-Ordóñez leads it with his usual flair and sure understanding of music that does not necessarily lend itself to ready comprehension… Gil-Ordóñez brings both knowledge and a sure hand in sound shaping to the performance.

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Music for the Lou Harrison Centennial

Disc review published on April 15, 2017 in Stereophile

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

Harrison wrote the first two movements of Concerto for Violin and Percussion in 1940, and revised them when he created the final movement in 1959. Astoundingly modern, it combines a wild battery of percussion with extremely challenging writing for the violin. Amidst its unbounded inventiveness and jollities, Grand Duo also reflects the gravity with which Harrison viewed the world. A proponent of boundary-less societies, he condemned war and violence, and promoted Esperanto as a universal language.

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Review of Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

Disc review published on April 15, 2017 in David's Review Corner / Naxos

In reference to Lou Harrison: Violin Concerto / Grand Duo / Double Music

To my innocent ears, the performances from hugely regarded musicians are certainly idiomatic, the violinist, Tim Fain, as a persuasive advocate of the Concerto and Grand Duo. Recordings are derived from 2016 sessions. Harrison wrote the first two movements of Concerto for Violin and Percussion in 1940, and revised them when he created the final movement in 1959. Astoundingly modern, it combines a wild battery of percussion with extremely challenging writing for the violin.

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Redes – The classic 1935 Mexican film with a score by Silvestre Revueltas

Disc review published on September 01, 2016 in ClassicalCDReview.com

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

The magnificent score is by Silvestre Revueltas. For this release the entire score is heard in a superb digital recording with the PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez, recorded in May 2014 at the University of Maryland, College Park.

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Gil-Ordóñez, atrapado por las ‘Redes’

Disc review published on August 16, 2016 in El País in Spanish

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

Angel Gil-Ordóñez and Joseph Horowitz have long been dedicated to rescuing the lost memory of art, works that are not worth losing in amnesia. Gil-Ordóñez is a professor, musician and conductor of the Georgetown University orchestra; Horowitz is a musicologist. Both have now endeavored to remove from oblivion the historic Mexican film Redes, codirected in 1936 by Fred Zinnemann and Emilio Gómez Muriel, with cinematography by Paul Strand. The film chronicles the harsh working conditions of a fishing village in Michoacan in post-revolutionary Mexico.

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A major film score by the Mexican Silvestre Revueltas

Disc review published on August 15, 2016 in Crescendo Magazine in French

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

The film, meanwhile, is universally recognized as a masterpiece of Latin American cinema of the early twentieth century. At the head of the PostClassical Ensemble, Angel Gil-Ordoñez is excellent in the quasi-religious aspect of this music, which he renders in all its radical beauty.

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Aparición de Silvestre Revueltas

Disc review published on May 28, 2016 in El País in Spanish

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

Gil-Ordóñez and Horowitz have for years spread in the United States a vision radically stripped of exoticism of the best Spanish music, Falla, Albéniz, Óscar Esplá, or vindicating such singular composers as Bernard Herrmann. In some of those adventures, in which the excellent pianist Pedro Carboné usually participates, I have been fortunate to see myself included. The most recent is another great rediscovery: the premiere and recording of the entire score composed by Silvestre Revueltas for a legendary Mexican film, Redes, directed in 1935 by photographer Paul Strand and exiled Austrian filmmaker Fred Zinnemann.

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(+++) Reconsiderations

Disc review published on May 12, 2016 in Infodad.com

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

Interestingly, Revueltas’ complete score has never been recorded before, so the recording by the Post-Classical Ensemble under Angel Gil-Ordóñez – one of the most inventive, clever and high-quality groups of its type – is a world première. The music rarely overlaps film dialogue, instead enhancing the story line and helping propel the narrative in highly effective program-music fashion.

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Newly recorded score is highlight of Mexican neo-doc Redes

Disc review published on May 05, 2016 in Los Angeles Times

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

The DVD release under the Naxos label is Redes, a 1935 Mexican neo-documentary about the plight of impoverished fishermen. Though the film is co-directed by Fred Zinnemann and stunningly photographed by Paul Strand, the real lure is the rich, pulsating score by Silvestre Revueltas, here dramatically recorded for the first time in stereo by the PostClassical Ensemble. It’s a pleasure to experience.

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Revueltas’ Score for Redes (Nets), Complete With Film

Disc review published on May 01, 2016 in ClassicsToday.com

In reference to Silvestre Revueltas: Redes (DVD)

Silvestre Revueltas’ score for the 1935 film Redes (Nets) remains one of his greatest works, full of captivating rhythms, vivid instrumental color, and characteristic melodic inspiration. It is splendidly performed here by the PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez, newly synchronized to a lovely restored version of the original film.

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The Top 10 Most-Coveted New Classical Tracks Albums of 2014

Disc review published on December 30, 2014 in Minnesota Public Radio

In reference to Dvořák and America

Dvořák and America is a new recording that tells Dvořák’s story while he was in America: what he experienced, how he impacted Americans and their composers, and how he processed his experiences into music.

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Dvořák and America

Disc review published on September 01, 2014 in ClassicalCDReview.com

In reference to Dvořák and America

Excellent performances throughout, and text is provided for Hiawatha. This is a fascinating, unusual disk worthy of investigation.

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Dvorak und Amerika

Disc review published on July 23, 2014 in Pizzicato in German

In reference to Dvořák and America

The main piece of this program is the Hiawatha Melodrama, a concert work for narrator and orchestra showing the relation between Dvorak’s New World Symphony and Longfellow’s poem The Song of Hiawatha, which Dvorak said had inspired him in the symphony. This work and some other compositions honor the relation between the Czech composer and American music and culture.

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(++++) Combos

Disc review published on July 03, 2014 in Infodad.com

In reference to Dvořák and America

This compendium of music and words provides a genuinely interesting and difficult-to-describe musical experience that provides considerable insight into the ways in which America influenced Dvořák and the way the great Czech composer returned the favor.

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Horowitz And Beckerman Offer A Fresh Look At Dvorák

Disc review published on July 01, 2014 in ClassicToday.com

In reference to Dvořák and America

This is one of those rare “concept albums” where the concept actually works. It offers a truly fresh and interesting perspective on Dvorák’s American period, while still assembling a program that makes for enjoyable listening on its own. Few of us bother to read Longfellow’s poem anymore, but hearing it wedded to Dvorák’s music really does create a powerful and, somehow, nostalgic atmosphere of perhaps a more innocent age. I found it quite moving, and the rest of the performances very enjoyable. You will too.

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Discs: A BPO Premiere is extended for a recording premiere by another orchestra

Disc review published on June 26, 2014 in The Buffalo News

In reference to Dvořák and America

The performances are unfailingly excellent, with Kevin Deas (the only holdover from the 2012 Buffalo concert) deserves special mention for his mellifluous yet passionate narration of the Hiawatha texts, which are provided in the liner notes. This is not background music, and deserves your full attention, including reading Horowitz’s fluent but comprehensive program notes.

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